Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:20 pm

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David McNiven


With U-21 caps against Sweden, Czechoslovakia and Wales, and retained as a backup player through some of the more successful years in Leeds' history, David McNiven can't have been all that bad a player, despite what a few folks with selective and rather biased memories may think. He came through the youth and reserve sides, appearing for the Scottish Schoolboy side and was thought of as a real prospect for the future as he hammered in the goals at the lower level, including three hat-tricks in the 1975-76 Central League season alone. When he did play for Leeds, his scoring record wasn't that bad, but still he failed to secure a regular berth in the first team at Elland Road. He later showed he knew where the net was during a good spell with Bradford. Like many borderline successful players in the early 1980s, he spent some time playing in the NASL before returning for half a season with Halifax and then non-league football at Morecambe.

Mark Serella says: what can you say. I thought he was the Alan Smith of his generation and super sub was his tag. He was better than Ole Gunnar any day.


For me, "well" i just remember him scoring at Anfield and that was good enough at the time ;) (sham)
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:30 pm

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John Hawley

John Hawley started his career with his local league club Hull City. He attracted attention early on his career by taking the highly unusual step of playing as an amateur for his first seasons at Hull. In five seasons he scored 22 goals for Hull in 114 games before he move to Leeds United. He scored a goal every other game at Leeds with 16 from 33 games, before moving to Sunderland
Only 33 games :o , I would of liked him to stay a bit longer back then. (sham)
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:41 pm

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Vince Hilaire


Hilaire began his career with Crystal Palace as a 17 year old in a 3–2 defeat at Lincoln City in March 1977 and rose to prominence with the side prophesied to be the "Team of the Eighties" after winning the Second Division championship title in 1978–79. He made over 255 league appearances for Crystal Palace, scoring 29 goals, and was Supporters 'Player of The Year' in 1979 and 1980. He also played one summer season in the NASL with the San Jose Earthquakes in 1982.
He joined Luton Town in July 1984 but made only six appearance before being transferred to Portsmouth a few months later in November 1984, where he made 146 appearances, scoring 25 goals. He moved to Leeds United in the summer of 1988, playing 51 games and scoring seven goals, then moved on to Stoke City in November 1989

Probably had his best days before he joined Leeds but even so I saw him score some classy goals at Elland Road, a fans favourite ;) (sham)
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 11, 2011 10:59 pm

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Kenny Burns

As a striker at Birmingham, and then as a defender with Forest's European Cup-winning side, Kenny Burns was a well-known player before he arrived at Leeds. Despite his enthusiasm and drive, he couldn't motivate the players around him to make the effort necessary to keep Leeds in Division 1, and after 18 months of games for a Leeds side struggling to escape from Division 2, he moved on to Derby after a loan spell. He dropped down to non-league football in 1986, playing for a variety of Midlands sides, before taking the standard exit route of footballers into pub management towards the end of the 1980s.

Richard Walker says: In the season when we went down Kenny Burns used to take the most amazing free kicks - straight into touch, as if he was almost kicking for touch. He was always betrayed as a hard man and the crowd loved him but I think he'd had it by the time he got to Leeds.

Kenny was one of the best players to play at st andrews. As good at the back as he was up front. A rougher tougher version of chris sutton. he was part of a decent bunch of players at st andrews at that time

I once saw him score a hat trick for Birmingham City on Match of the Day. It was the days of snow bound pitches and orange fotballs. I think he won a car for his feats. Then he became part of that fantastic forest team. God knows who switched him to central defence but it woked. He's been a bit of a hero of mine for ages. Partly due to his inability to grow that moustache that rather patheticaly adorned his upper lip.


For his determination a ruthlessness he's only one of a few that Revie would of liked IMO.
It was a given to us Leeds fans that if he got kicked it was only a matter of time before he got his own back on the said player. "Hard case" (sham)
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 11, 2011 11:07 pm

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Brian Flynn


He looked like a fey Subbuteo player, but little Brian Flynn was a pint-sized colossus at a club that has specialised in them - Collins, Bremner, Giles, Strachan et al. Flynn would have made the list for the simple fact he once scored the winner at Old Trafford, but he was also a wolf in sheep's clothing, fiercely competitive and the perfect foil for Tony Currie's flamboyance.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 11, 2011 11:16 pm

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Alex Sabella

Alejandro Sabella joined Sheffield United from River Plate for £160,000 and proved to be a big hit with the fans. After two seasons at Bramall Lane, he was snapped up by Leeds, but, with the side struggling, there were not many outlets for his silky skills. Allan Clarke decided he could do without him, and he returned to Argentina to play for Estudiantes. It was a good move for the player, since it brought him to the attention of the national coach and he picked up 4 caps. He later spent a season with Gremio of Brazil before returning again to Argentina.

Duncan Ogan says: I saw Sabella play in Argentina, from 1975 to 1978. He had one of greatest stars, Norberto Alonso, in front of him, but every time he had a chance to play, he showed great talent. One day, the brazilian team Cruzeiro sent in a spy to see Alonso play. Since Alonso was injured, Sabella played for him and was the star of the game. The spy then said: If this is the sub, I cannot imagine how good Alonso is! (that was in Libertadores Cup 1976 against Independiente, a game I saw) Sabella is assistant coach for Passarella in Monterrey Mexico. We invited him to play the Legends of Soccer Cup 2003 and I sincerely hope he can make it. This Cup is played in Dallas and is an over 35 international tournament. http://www.legendsofsoccer.net

Frank Hearnshaw says: I saw Sabella when he played for Sheffield Utd,I am from Sheffield, he was a thoroughbred playing amongst donkeys at United at that time. He was a true class act, and supremely skilfull a crying shame his talent never reached its full potential.

Steve the Blade says: A true star. Too good for both Leeds & us (the Blades) if he had played for Victimpool or Man utd he would have been the best overseas player to play in England EVER!!

Hornsea Potter says: It was worth the admission just to see him. My one abiding moment at the Lane was seeing Bonds and Lampard run into each other by the corner flag at the Shoreham end after a piece of Sabells magic against West Ham.Frank is right in that Sabella was too good for remainder of the Blades.


I remember it well when he played for us.

A lot of our fans said he was shite but i always had a very different opinion, I thought he was too good for the players around him and that's why it didn't work out for him at ER. ..................IMO (sham)
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Sun Nov 13, 2011 6:51 pm

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Jock Stein


After a brief period with assistant manager Maurice Lindley at the helm, the board recruited former Celtic supremo Jock Stein to replace Armfield. The Scot, who had led the Glasgow club to European Cup glory in 1967, had been replaced at Parkhead by former skipper Billy McNeill and he was disaffected with the Glasgow giants. It was generally accepted that Stein's move was motivated more by resentment against his former employers than any great desire to restore United's fortunes.

He had previously rejected a number of offers from other English clubs and at 55 he had no real hunger to uproot his family, but could not bear to be offered a backroom job at Celtic and he accepted the United position on August 21. It was reported that Stein hadn't been Leeds' first choice; apparently Lawrie McMenemy had turned down an offer, leaving the directors to pursue their next best option.

There were high hopes at Elland Road that Stein, with his experience and standing in the game, could take United back to the very top, but it was soon clear that his heart wasn't in the move. He never signed a contract and quit after six weeks to take control of the Scottish national side.



All a bit of a shame in many ways "oh" what could of been and a very nice man too.
I always thought he was the man to replace Revie for some reason (sham)
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Mon Nov 14, 2011 9:15 pm

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Eddie Gray


Gray was a cultured winger who was an integral member of the legendary Leeds United football team of the 1960s and 1970s, later twice becoming the club's manager. Eddie Gray was without doubt the most gifted player ever to play for Leeds United, he was better than George Best but did not get the same recognition because he played for Leeds. Gray was a schoolboy international for Scotland, and signed professional forms for Leeds at the age of sixteen in January 1965. When Eddie first came to Leeds he played in a practice match against the first team, after the game Jack Charlton told Don Revie that Leeds had better sign him as he did not want to have to play against him twice a season. He made his first team debut on New Year's Day 1966, fewer than three weeks before his eighteenth birthday, and would go on to play for the club for almost twenty years. A winger in the classic mould, Gray was feted in world football for his ability to beat opposing full backs for pace and thought. As the Leeds team grew in stature and experience through the 1960s, Gray became a vital component of the team. In 1968 he was in the Leeds team which won the League Cup and the Fairs Cup and then the League championship a year later. It was in 1970 that he made his most famous appearance in a Leeds shirt. The team was chasing a unique "treble" of League championship, FA Cup and European Cup with Gray in sparkling form. Days before he had already scored what many Leeds fans call the greatest goal ever by a Leeds player, a solo run past at least six Burnley players in the space of twenty yards using his shoulder drops to throw the opposition off balance then rolling the ball back, leaving the defenders on the floor totally perplexed before cool as you like passing the ball into the net. Incidently he lobbed the keeper from thirty-five yards in the same game. When his day came at Wembley for the FA Cup final against Chelsea, Gray's marking full back was David Webb, a steady but undistinguished defender whom, for the ninety minutes and extra-time period, Gray would duly torment. Webb was, time and again, left on his backside or looking the wrong way as Gray ghosted past him on countless occasions. The game still ended 2-2 and a replay was required - Gray had taken the corner which had allowed Jack Charlton to open the scoring. In the replay, Chelsea changed tactics and put the more uncompromising Ron Harris on to Gray and as a result, Gray's danger was snuffed out through a series of deliberate fouls which went largely unpunished. Chelsea won 2-1 and, in a final ironic twist, it was Webb who scored the winner. Leeds lost the League championship race to Everton and the European Cup semi final to Celtic, thereby ended with nothing. Gray's battles with injury duly started, and he missed more than half of the 1971 season, during which Leeds again snatched League championship defeat from the jaws of victory but won the Fairs Cup again. He was in the team which won the FA Cup against Arsenal in 1972 and duly lost it a year later to Sunderland, but missed out on a title medal when Leeds finally won the League again in 1974 thanks to more injury woes. Written off by some but encouraged by Jimmy Armfield, he fought his way back to full health and during his rehabilitation coached the juniors and forced his way back to first team recognition and played in the team which reached the European Cup final in Paris in 1975 but lost, controversially, to Bayern Munich. Also in the team was his younger brother Frank, who had likewise come through the ranks at Elland Road. This was the swansong of the great Don Revie team, Revie himself had left a year earlier to take over as England manager, and Gray's team-mates started to leave the club. By the end of the 1970s, Gray was the only player from any part of the Revie era still at the club, although Peter Lorimer would later make a comeback. Now converted to left back, taking over from his brother, who had been transferred to Nottingham Forest, Gray prolonged his career and was in the side which was relegated under former team-mate Allan Clarke in 1982. Gray then took over as manager for two seasons, while still playing, but finally left the club after being unable to regain promotion from the Second Division. His association with Leeds was severed in 1985 after twenty years, five hundred and sixty-one games and sixty-eight goals. He managed Whitby Town, Rochdale and Hull City before returning to Leeds as a coach in the summer of 1995. Eddie returned to Elland Road to help with the development of the youngsters, under Howard Wilkinson and in his first full season saw the youth team lift the FA Youth Cup in 1996, as he worked alongside Paul Hart. Then after the departure of Dave Williams to Scumchester United in 1997, he became reserve team coach, guiding the second string to the Pontins Premier Division title in his first season in charge. His work with the youth set-up nurtured a terrific generation of Leeds players such as Harry Kewell, Ian Harte, Alan Smith and Jonathan Woodgate, who all went on to become first team regulars. He was an immediate choice to support David O'Leary as his No.2 when the Irishman became Leeds boss in October 1998. Unfortunately O'Leary decided to bring Brian Kidd in.This was clearly the point when Leeds United troubles all began. Leeds United football got gradually worse, Leds were losing games they should have drawn and drawing games they should have won. This meant that Leeds did not qualify for the Champions League and all the financial problems became an issue. Both he and Brian Kidd fell to a cost cutting exercise. When Peter Reid left Leeds in 2004, Gray was charged with the task of trying to preserve their FA Premier League status, something which under immense pressure, he could not do. Amidst all the notorious pontificating from ambitious, headstrong board members, a self-obsessed chairman and fly-by-night managers, it was left to a genuine Leeds man to try to stop the club from going to the wall. Gray parted company once again with the club after relegation. Gray's unfortunate injury record, and the presence of Rangers winger Jim Baxter, meant that his Scotland career was short and infrequent. He won just twelve caps and missed the 1974 World Cup through injury. He also gained two Under-twenty-three caps. He was never booked in the whole of his career. Brother of Frank Gray, uncle of Andy Gray. His sons Stuart, of Celtic and Reading and Nick, who was on Leeds United’s books, both played professionally.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:40 pm

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1979-1980 Played 11 Scored 3 goals (Division 1)
1980-1981 Played 26 Scored 5 goals (Division 1)
1981-1982 Played 12 Scored 2 goals (Division 1)
1982-1983 Played 1 Scored 0 goals (Division 2)

Derek joined Leeds from Glasgow Rangers in March 1980. He scored 10 goals in his 50 league appearances for United before a move to Hong Kong. He returned to English football with Scumchester City in the summer of 1983. Derek is pictured above during the 0-0 draw against Victimpool on 27/12/1980.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:55 pm

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Darren Huckerby


1999-2000 Played 33 Scored 2 goals (Premiership)
2000-2001 Played 7 Scored 0 goals (Premiership)

Transferred to Scumchester City on 29/12/2000 for £2, 250, 000

Darren Huckerby was a £4 million signing from Coventry City by David O'Leary in August 1999. Despite his hefty price tag Huckerby was never able to establish himself at Elland Road and of his 40 league appearances, 29 were as a substitute. He moved on to Scumchester City in December 2000, with United losing £1 million on the player.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:01 pm

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Terry Connor

Local lad Terry Connor joined Leeds as an apprentice and signed professionally in November 1979. He spent just over three years at Elland Road, scoring 19 goals in 96 league games, before moving on to Brighton. Terry is pictured above during the 1-1 draw against Scumchester City on 16th February 1980.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:08 pm

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Mark Gavin


Gavin played for High Tunstall School, Hartlepool, Cleveland and Durham Boys and had Scottish Youth trials. He joined Leeds in May 1980, but in the summer of 1982 he was freed by Allan Clarke. After Allan Clarke was dismissed, Eddie Gray re-signed him. The speed-merchant winger was one of the many young exciting players given a chance to shine at that time by Eddie Gray, but he did not live up to his early promise and, after a seven match loan spell with Hartlepool United, starting in March 1985 and scoring once in seven games, he was signed on a free transfer by Carlisle United in July 1985. After twelve starts and one substitute appearance and one goal, he moved to Bolton Wanderers in March 1986 for £10,000, where he scored three times in forty-eight starts and one game as a substitute before he rejoined his old mentor, Eddie Gray, at Rochdale in July 1987 for £20,000. He scored six goals in twenty-three games before moving on to Hearts for £30,000 in February 1988 and then joined Bristol City in October 1988 for £30,000. He shone at Ashton Gate, playing sixty-nine games, seven of which were from the bench, and scoring six goals and this resulted in a £250,000 move, which included the Part-Exchange of Wayne Allison that took him to Watford in October 1990. Gavin never settled at Watford, making only eight run-on and five substitute appearances without scoring, before returning to Bristol City in December 1991 for £60,000. He made thirty-four starts and seven substitute appearances and scored seven goals in his second sojourn at Ashton Gate before moving to Exeter in February 1994. He made seventy-three starts and four substitute appearances, scoring four times, but in August 1996 he joined Scunthorpe United, where he failed to score in ten appearances and one substitution. He then returned to Hartlepool United in September 1997 but only managed three substitute appearances and was freed in June 1998 and joined Morton.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:24 pm

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Gunnar Halle

Joined Leeds from Oldham Athletic in December 1996 for a fee of £400, 000. He played 70 league games for United, scoring 4 goals, before moving on to Bradford City in the summer of 1999 for a fee of £200, 000.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:31 pm

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Dylan Kerr

Leeds Utd.: 1992-1993 Played 5 Scored 0 goals (Premiership)

Dylan Kerr signed for Leeds in January 1989 from South African side Arcadia Shepherds. He was unable to establish himself during his 4 years at Elland Road and moved on to Reading in the summer of 1993 for a fee of £75, 000
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:55 pm

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Don Howe

Donald 'Don' Howe was born in October 12, 1935 and was a player with West Bromwich Albion before Billy Wright signed him for Arsenal in 1964 and made him club captain. Howe retired from playing and became Arsenal's reserve team coach under Bertie Mee, before stepping up to the role of first team coach after the departure of Dave Sexton in 1968. He later returned to his old club, West Bromwich Albion, as manager before stints as coach of Galatasaray, Turkey and Leeds United, before rejoining Arsenal in 1977 as head coach.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:14 pm

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Terry Hibbitt

Terry Hibbitt's impressive entrance into senior football hinted that he could be one of the most glorious talents to emerge from Leeds United's golden generation of the Sixties. He was given his first team debut as an 18-year-old against Nottingham Forest on 19 February 1966, coming on as a first half substitute for Paul Madeley. Within minutes of taking the field Hibbitt scored a stunning goal, lobbing goalkeeper Peter Grummitt from 20 yards.

For the next three years the talented left winger continued to show rich potential whenever given an opportunity by Don Revie, but he disappeared into the cul-de-sac of reserve team football after the talented Eddie Gray established himself as Revie's preferred choice on the left flank. A £30,000 transfer to Newcastle United in 1971 gave Hibbitt the chance of reviving his career, and he used the platform to give clear evidence of his prowess in a playmaking role.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:22 pm

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Casper Ankergren


Casper joined the club initially on loan during the latter half of the 2006/07 season before signing a three-year contract with the club at the beginning of August 2007, after initially coming from Brondby on a loan deal at the start of the year.
He was the first player to sign a contract after the club emerged from administration.
The 6ft 3in keeper establikshed himself as a regular during the 2007/08 season, making 50 appearances, and he went on to make 39 first team appearances the following season.
After starting the season as No 1 keeper injury kept him out of a number of games, when his place was taken by Dave Lucas, who clocked up 18 appearances.
But once Simon Grayson had taken over as manager, Ankergren became his first choice keeper for the remainder of the season and he played in the final 27 matches of the season, keeping 11 clean sheets as United battled their way to the to the Play-Offs.
Now in his third full season with the club, Casper had clocked up over 100 appearances for Leeds United by the end of the 2008/09 season, reaching his century in a 1-0 win at Hartlepool United on April 25.
However, following the summer 2009 arrival of Shane Higgs, Casper found himself on the bench at the start of the new campaign.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:30 pm

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Peter Hampton

Former United full-back Peter Hampton is still involved in the game as a coach at Carlisle and working as a physio. He looks back with Leon Wobschall at his busy career.

WHILE Leeds United’s disgruntled players were pretty glad to see the back of the man who became universally known as Old Big ‘Ead in the turbulent autumn of 1974, one of his young charges during his ill-fated 44-day tenure will always feel a sense of ‘what might have been.’

The man in question is ex-Whites left-back Peter Hampton, who remembers Hurricane Clough whirling into West Yorkshire and attempting to sweep away most of what came in its path as if it was yesterday.

The stormy episode in United’s history may have been brief, but its impact in the football world was seismic, with books written on the subject and a feature film even made over a generation on since Clough’s exit from the club he used to hate, but incredibly ended up managing.

In terms of his own career, Hampton – now 56 and settled in Cumbria – is entitled to wonder how things could have changed if the course of history had taken a different direction. More to the point what if the legendary former Derby County and Nottingham Forest manager had actually stayed at United and got his feet under the table?

Quality

It took the Lancastrian, who joined the club in September 1971, five years until he got a decent run in the United first-team and while his time – unfortunately for him – dovetailed with a surfeit of quality international-class left-backs in the United ranks, in first Terry Cooper and then Trevor Cherry and Frank Gray, he feels things could have been different if Cloughie had laid roots at Elland Road.

Hampton said: “The club was in transition for most of my time there and obviously we had the Cloughie situation. Who knows what would have happened if he’d stayed there? The club went onto get a load of different managers in and then just went down the pan, didn’t they…?

“I’m sure I would have done well as he’d been alright with me. I was only a young kid and he was playing me regularly in the reserves. With Cloughie, if he didn’t want you, you’d just be out of the door – no hanging about, you were in or out…

“I remember that on his first day at Leeds, he sent the lad next to me in the dressing room home for not being shaved properly, while I also remember immediately after a friendly against Huddersfield being told to go and get some beer in for the lads.

“I knew I had to get a crate or else I’d be in trouble, but that was the sort of man Brian was. He could demand anything at any time. The only shame is he never became England boss.”

Handed his debut at The Dell against Southampton in April 1972 at the age of just 17, a glittering United career lie in prospect for Hampton, recipient of several England youth caps, while representing his country in a mini-Under-18s World Cup, playing alongside the likes of future Elland Road team-mate Ray Hankin and Tony Morley.

But it didn’t truly get off the ground until 1976-77 when left-back rival Frank Gray switched to midfield, allowing him his first regular run in the side.

But injuries complicated the mix for Hampton, although he still sampled several precious nuggets of big-game action, although one of his most memorable moments arrived when he scored a rare and spectacular winning goal in a substitute’s cameo against Burnley – who he went onto play for in the 80s – in 1975-76.

Hampton said: “I can recall being pulled off the bus when we were playing against Burnley as someone had gone down and I was put on the bench. Terry Yorath came off at half-time and he famously gave two fingers to some of the crowd and I came on and scored the winner, so I’ll always remember that!

“I was also on the bench for the European Cup final in Paris and also played in the FA Cup semi-final against (Scumchester) United in 1977 when we were 2-0 down after ten minutes, which was a bit unfortunate. That was my first season in the first team and we went on this great cup run and I remember thinking: ‘This is a piece of cake, this!’ Then there was the semi-final of the League Cup as well against Forest the year after.

“In my time at Leeds, there was Cherry and then Frank and the competition was really intense and then I suffered from injuries, which kind of knocked me back a bit. But the experience was fantastic.

“Before I joined Leeds, I actually nearly signed for (Scumchester) City, who were my team as a youngster and I was born almost outside the ground before going to the north east at about 10.

“I came to Leeds to just have a look and I don’t know why, but I just signed for them. Don (Revie) actually came up to my school and then my house and I signed up and that was that!”

“Despite everything, I enjoyed my time at Leeds. But it was at Stoke where I managed to get games consistently under Alan Durban
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:47 pm

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Shaun Derry

The signing of Shaun Derry was a direct sign of the huge change that had come over the wreck that was Leeds United AFC. We attempted to sign him back in November 2004 but the Board that saved Leeds from administration struggled and ultimately failed to come up with the finance needed to complete the deal. Humiliation followed as the deal had already been made public and the player was already training with the Leeds squad!

Since those dark days Ken Bates took over and Shaun signed a two-and-a-half-year deal for an undisclosed fee.

Unfortunately, Derry fell out with Dennis Wise and was sidelined.

Eventually Derry returned to Crystal Palace. In 2008 he missed the chance of a return to Elland Road with Palace in the Carling Cup 2nd round as he was typically serving a ban. He may have been glad as Neil Warnock's team were battered 4-0.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:59 pm

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David White

He joined Scumchester City after serving his apprenticeship and playing for Salford Boys. White was part of the famous 1986 generation, and a proud member of the "Fabulous Five" (Lake, White, Redmond, Brightwell and Hinchcliffe who were the backbone of the team that won the FA Youth Cup in 1985 and became first-team players shortly after). During his eight years as a City player he tormented the opposing defences and together with Niall Quinn formed a lethal attacking power for the Blues. He made one England appearance, against Spain in 1992, two for England ‘B’, six at Under-Twenty-one level and had an outing for the Youth side in a Maine Road career that brought him over a century of goals, including four against Aston Villa in a 5-1 triumph in April 1991. However, after his International call-up his form dipped. White was a powerful force for City during their best campaigns since the mid 1970s as they attained fifth place twice. White was strong, athletic and an extremely fast runner, even by EPL standards. He scored ninety-four goals in three hundred and thirty-three League and Cup games for the Blues and was rated as one of the top goalscorers in the club’s history. He scored seventy-nine goals in two hundred and seventy- three starts and twelve games from the bench in the League and score fifteen in forty-eight games in the Cup competitions. He was also the prime provider of crosses for Niall Quinn who scored most of his goals while White was still at the club. Out went an unhappy David Rocastle and in came David White as United and Scumchester City traded right-sided midfielders in a deal that saw both players valued at £2 million apiece. But like Rocastle, White struggled with injury and the burden of replacing the inspirational Gordon Strachan. He never really nailed down a regular first-team place because of ankle trouble and many of his better performances in Leeds colours were as substitute with his powerful, direct running providing goals late in games against tiring teams. He could be devastating when the feeling took him and on one such occasion against Everton on 30th April 1994 he decided that it was the day to do it. United had struggled and were looking second best to the relegation threatened men from Goodison, who had squandered several good chances to put them ahead in the first-half. With the score 0-0 and sixty-seven minutes already elapsed White replaced Noel Whelan. One minute after his arrival White set up Rod Wallace who hit the post with a header from White’s cross. Four minutes later United were ahead as White swerved past David Unsworth and was deep into the penaty area when he was halted by Gary Ablett, but the ball ran loose and Gary McAllister gave United the lead. Everton missed two more easy chances before White put the game beyond their reach three minutes later, when he capped off another strong run with a powerful shot that was deflected into the net by Dave Watson. Right on the final whistle White finally got his name on the scoresheet when another powerful run took him to the edge of the penalty area where he unleashed a superb shot which curled past the diving Neville Southall. That was what White was capable of and understandably few could understand why his Elland Road form was a far cry from the displays he produced for Scumchester City, when on his day he could be so devastating.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:15 pm

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Aidan Butterworth

Local lad Aidan Butterworth came up through the ranks at Elland Road, signing professional forms in May 1980. He scored 15 league goals for United, with his best campaign being 1982/83, when he netted 11 goals in 38 league games. He moved on to Doncaster Rovers in the summer of 1984.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:23 pm

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Andy Watson

Scottish U-21 midfielder who enjoyed early success with the Aberdeen, appearing in their Cup Winners Cup triumph in 1983. Later that year he was picked up by Leeds as Eddie Gray tried to build a solid base to press for a return to the top flight. He never really fitted in, and after a season and a half was on his way back to Scotland.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 9:58 pm

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Arthur Graham

Arthur Graham signed for Leeds after 8 solid - but largely unrewarded - years with Aberdeen and proceeded to establish himself as a firm favorite with the Leeds fans and finally received his full international cap after several Youth and U-23 appearances for Scotland. An excellent attacking winger, he created and scored many goals for Leeds in his 6 years at Elland Road, including three hat-tricks against Birmingham, Valetta and Wolves. With the team showing no signs of escaping from Division 2, Graham moved over the Pennines to Old Trafford, where he enjoyed two reasonable seasons before moving on to Bradford City. He did some coaching with the club and was caretaker manager for a month in 1989.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:07 pm

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Peter "Lasher" Lorimer

Peter Lorimer 'what a shot he could tie them in a knot'. He was all my friends' hero, he scored loads of goals and we all called him 'Ninety', because he hit his shots at the mythical, '90-miles-an-hour'! Sadly, I all but missed seeing this stage of his career, but was a season ticket holder when he returned to the club as a player when his friend, Eddie Gray was manager.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:23 pm

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Jeff Chandler

Bit-part midfielder in a Leeds side that was starting to fall apart at the end of the 1970s. He won 2 caps while at Elland Road, but didn't win a regular place and was probably grateful to get away from Elland Road when he was sold in October 1981.

Apparently he shares his name with a boxer - who was world bantamweight champion from 1980-84 and rated as the best pound-for-pound fighter in the world at the time - and a film star who played in numerous movies from the late 1940s to early 1960s.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:29 pm

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Mark Aizlewood



Signed from Charlton in Billy Bremner's chase for promotion in 1987, Mark Aizlewood brought some solidity to the midfield and found himself facing his old team-mates in the play-off final at the end of the year. Unfortunately, he found himself on the losing side but he became a regular for Leeds and also kept his place in Wales' national side, picking up 9 full caps while at Leeds to add to the 3 he picked up while at Charlton.

He was made club captain by Bremner, and continued in that role under Wilko, despite some disciplinary problems on and off the field. However a "gesture" that he made in frustration to the Kop during a run of poor form was the end of his Leeds career: subbed, stripped of the captaincy and playing for Bradford by the end of the summer.

Aizlewood went on to win more caps for his country while still playing for lower division teams in England: always a battler but without that final couple of percent of discipline, athleticism and talent that might have propelled him to the very top level.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:31 pm

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Mark Aizlewood

Signed from Charlton in Billy Bremner's chase for promotion in 1987, Mark Aizlewood brought some solidity to the midfield and found himself facing his old team-mates in the play-off final at the end of the year. Unfortunately, he found himself on the losing side but he became a regular for Leeds and also kept his place in Wales' national side, picking up 9 full caps while at Leeds to add to the 3 he picked up while at Charlton.

He was made club captain by Bremner, and continued in that role under Wilko, despite some disciplinary problems on and off the field. However a "gesture" that he made in frustration to the Kop during a run of poor form was the end of his Leeds career: subbed, stripped of the captaincy and playing for Bradford by the end of the summer.

Aizlewood went on to win more caps for his country while still playing for lower division teams in England: always a battler but without that final couple of percent of discipline, athleticism and talent that might have propelled him to the very top level.
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Fri Nov 18, 2011 10:40 pm

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Thomas Brolin


When Tomas Brolin signed for Leeds in November 1995 he enjoyed a reputation as one of the world's best footballers. He had enjoyed some great seasons with Parma in Italy, helping them win the European Cup Winners' Cup in 1992. Brolin was also one of, if not the, best player in the Sweden team that finished in third place at the 1994 World Cup finals.

His pace and technique made him one of the most feared attacking midfielders in Europe at the time. But the decline was just about to start.

In an international match for Sweden in November 1994, Brolin broke his foot and had to undergo surgery. During this time, Parma were two points clear at the top of the Italian league. But when Brolin returned five months later, the team started to lose. He lost his place in the team and sought a move elsewhere, turning down offers from three Italian clubs before deciding to join Leeds United for £4.5 million.

A Career in Decline
United manager Howard Wilkinson saw Brolin as the perfect foil for the club's top scorer Tony Yeboah, and on the day of the signing, he said "He is a class player, and I believe he will prove to be an excellent buy for Leeds. I am sure he is going to be an excellent partner for Tony Yeboah". This was also the view of the Ghanaian forward "I am sure Tomas and I are going to work well together. He is truly world class. He can weigh in with goals of his own, and link up with the other players in the side. We are going to be very difficult to defend against."

Brolin had high hopes when he arrived in England in November 1995. "Give me a month to get my full fitness back, and to adapt to playing in England, and then I will show people what I can really do. I believe I can help Leeds win the Championship again. I have had great support from the fans and gradually regained my fitness. I am really excited about the future at Elland Road," he said.

Brolin scored his first goal against Sheffield Wednesday in December (Leeds lost 6-2,) and it was without a doubt one of the weirdest goals in his career.

During December, Brolin started a few games, and scored two goals against West Ham at Elland Road. He had now scored four goals in eight games. Maybe the purchase of the Swede would pay off after all.

... but then it all began. Howard Wilkinson and Tomas Brolin had different views on Brolin's role in the team. After the 5-0 defeat against Victimpool and 2-1 defeat against Nottingham Forest, Brolin was dropped for the League match against Aston Villa.

"Presumably, I didn't wake up in the middle of the night and have a vision, if Brolin had done well he would have played. I picked a team from 15 available players, with nine either suspended, injured or on international duty. I decided the team at Villa would be better without Tomas Brolin. If he had been playing brilliantly I would have picked him - but before we played Victimpool Brolin was concerned about the amount of defending he had to do for the side. He suggested I reconsider, he expressed the opinion he wasn't very good at it and he felt my decision to leave him out at Villa was eminently sensible," Wilkinson said in February 1996.

After this, Brolin only featured sporadically in a Leeds shirt. He came off the bench against Villa in the League Cup final and said later, "If I cannot play from the start in a final like that. I have to think about my future. I don't know where my future lies now. I wanted to play on Sunday, but the manager thinks his way and I think mine. Perhaps we should go our separate ways. I have to go away and think about my future and whether I want to play for Leeds. The way I feel at the moment, I think I must try to find another team."

Brolin began looking for a new club during the summer of 1996 but interest from Verona, Bari, Fiorentina, Sampdoria, Real Betis, Espanyol and Real Sociedad all came to nothing. Wilkinson fined Brolin a week's wages (around £12,000) for not turning up for pre-season training. Brolin went out on loan to FC Zurich and was quoted as saying, "I'm not surprised he's gone," when Wilkinson was sacked by Leeds in September.

New manager George Graham refused to allow Brolin's loan to continue beyond its scheduled end date of September 30 and was furious when the Swede didn't return, threatening to retire rather than play again for Leeds.

A loan move to Sampdoria fell through after a medical and then Brolin paid out £500,000 to fund a loan move back to Parma. The Italian club had a decent season but were clearly not interested in a long term deal, revealing that they had only agreed to a loan deal to allow him to regain fitness as a show of gratitude for his previous spell with the club.

When he returned to Elland Road, he was exiled to the reserves by George Graham and a number of proposed transfer deals all failed to come to anything. After missing training and publicly criticising Graham in a newspaper article, Brolin was fined £90,000. After a legal wrangle the player's contract was finally terminated. Graham: "Brolin didn't do much, did he? He was very quiet and I can't understand what all the hype was about. Apart from a couple of decent seasons with Parma, what's he ever done? You tell me. People think I fell out with him, but that's not the case at all. He told me he didn't want to play for Leeds, so there was no point in keeping him at the club."
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby grgck__ on Sun Nov 20, 2011 10:20 pm

Great read Sham, really interesting, thanks. Ashamed to say i've only really heard of the obvious ones amongst that lot :cry:

Claim to fame....... I was in the same year as Peter Hampton's son, big Everton fan.......Hampton must've played there later on?
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Re: Hero's n Zero's of Leeds United

Postby sham75 on Mon Nov 21, 2011 8:15 pm

grgck__ wrote:Great read Sham, really interesting, thanks. Ashamed to say i've only really heard of the obvious ones amongst that lot :cry:

Claim to fame....... I was in the same year as Peter Hampton's son, big Everton fan.......Hampton must've played there later on?


Cheers grgck, not sure if he played at Everton mate tbh :?

I just remember him as a steady sort of player at Leeds and then his time at Stoke.

His time at Leeds was when things seemed to stand still for us in a funny sort of way.
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